Our community

Sleeping out for a good cause

As you read this, more than 1600 Tasmanians don’t know where they’re going to sleep tonight.

That’s 1600 people, just like you, who won’t have a roof over their head when the rain pours, a thick doona to keep them warm on the coldest nights, or a hot meal at the end of the day.

Homelessness is a vicious cycle and one that needs to be broken. For many, the impacts of COVID-19 on finances and employment has only made the cycle worse. 

For those who are in a position to make a difference, the Vinnies CEO Sleepout is a meaningful initiative that goes directly to helping those who need it most. 

This year, our Group CEO Mark Mugnaioni took part, swapping his mattress for a cardboard box and sleeping outside. 

‘Spending one night outside is only a small taste of what those experiencing homelessness have to endure every single night of the year,’ Group CEO Mark Mugnaioni said. 

It was a brave move for this ex-Queenslander to spend a night outside during his first Tasmanian winter, but Mark is deeply passionate about this cause and helping others. 

‘This was one of the first things I committed to when accepting the position of Group CEO in October last year,’ Mark said.

‘Having a roof over your head shouldn’t be just a privilege, it should be a right for everyone. 

‘While it’s always important to look out for others, especially those doing it tough, with so many people being impacted by COVID-19 this year, initiatives such as the CEO Sleepout and organisations such as Vinnies are more important than ever.’

Mark was the top fundraiser in Tasmania, smashing his initial goal of $3000 and raising a total of $13,274 thanks to the generosity of family, friends, colleagues and supporters. Through his efforts, Mark has helped to fund 42 individual support plans, 110 beds and 442 meals for Tasmanians doing it tough.

So far, more than $5 million has been raised nationally.

‘I encourage all Tasmanians who are able to assist those less fortunate to do what they can to help break the cycle of homelessness.’ 

 

Back to Journeys